Learn About

Wet RotDry Rot

Below

Both dry rot and wet rot are caused by moisture, commonly from poor ventilation below the floor, rising or penetrating damp, water leaks etc. Normally, dry rot happens from relatively low moisture levels, and wet rot is from very high moisture levels.

WET ROT

Wet rot can be a white or brown rot, which does not refer to the colour of the mould, but the shade that the timber turns when affected. Brown rot will darken the wood, and will break in small cracks, where as white rot lightens the wood and the damage is visible across the grain.

Treating Wet Rot

Once Danford Brewer & Ives have identified the problem to be wet rot, the area will have to be properly ventilated to allow the wood to dry and the root cause of the problem will have to be solved. Any damaged timber will have to be replaced where necessary.

DRY ROT

Dry rot is different from wet rot in the sense that it can travel through a building taking its own moisture supply, and can travel between plaster and brick work as well as wood. Dry rot can cause severe damage if it is not treated.

Treating Dry Rot

Treating dry rot can be quite disruptive, as locating the causing source may require floor boards to be taken up or walls to be opened up. All affected timbers will need to be removed and the damp areas will have to be dried out thoroughly.

Whilst these measures are similar to treating wet rot, dry rot treatment often needs more. If any masonry has had contact with the dry rot, they will need treating with chemicals either as a spray or an injection, as will the surrounding timbers.

Although treating both dry and wet rot can seem very disruptive, it is necessary to rectify the problems to stop any further and perhaps lasting damage. Danford Brewer & Ives will strive to make sure the job is completed as quickly and hassle free as possible.